Pocket

引用:Software is eating the world

Software is eating the world.

More than 10 years after the peak of the 1990s dot-com bubble, a dozen or so new Internet companies like Facebook and Twitter are sparking controversy in Silicon Valley, due to their rapidly growing private market valuations, and even the occasional successful IPO. With scars from the heyday of Webvan and Pets.com still fresh in the investor psyche, people are asking, “Isn’t this just a dangerous new bubble?”

I, along with others, have been arguing the other side of the case. (I am co-founder and general partner of venture capital firm Andreessen-Horowitz, which has invested in Facebook, Groupon, Skype, Twitter, Zynga, and Foursquare, among others. I am also personally an investor in LinkedIn.) We believe that many of the prominent new Internet companies are building real, high-growth, high-margin, highly defensible businesses.

Today’s stock market actually hates technology, as shown by all-time low price/earnings ratios for major public technology companies. Apple, for example, has a P/E ratio of around 15.2 — about the same as the broader stock market, despite Apple’s immense profitability and dominant market position (Apple in the last couple weeks became the biggest company in America, judged by market capitalization, surpassing Exxon Mobil). And, perhaps most telling, you can’t have a bubble when people are constantly screaming “Bubble!”

But too much of the debate is still around financial valuation, as opposed to the underlying intrinsic value of the best of Silicon Valley’s new companies. My own theory is that we are in the middle of a dramatic and broad technological and economic shift in which software companies are poised to take over large swathes of the economy.

More and more major businesses and industries are being run on software and delivered as online services — from movies to agriculture to national defense. Many of the winners are Silicon Valley-style entrepreneurial technology companies that are invading and overturning established industry structures. Over the next 10 years, I expect many more industries to be disrupted by software, with new world-beating Silicon Valley companies doing the disruption in more cases than not.

Why is this happening now?

Six decades into the computer revolution, four decades since the invention of the microprocessor, and two decades into the rise of the modern Internet, all of the technology required to transform industries through software finally works and can be widely delivered at global scale.

Over two billion people now use the broadband Internet, up from perhaps 50 million a decade ago, when I was at Netscape, the company I co-founded. In the next 10 years, I expect at least five billion people worldwide to own smartphones, giving every individual with such a phone instant access to the full power of the Internet, every moment of every day.

On the back end, software programming tools and Internet-based services make it easy to launch new global software-powered start-ups in many industries — without the need to invest in new infrastructure and train new employees. In 2000, when my partner Ben Horowitz was CEO of the first cloud computing company, Loudcloud, the cost of a customer running a basic Internet application was approximately $150,000 a month. Running that same application today in Amazon’s cloud costs about $1,500 a month.

With lower start-up costs and a vastly expanded market for online services, the result is a global economy that for the first time will be fully digitally wired — the dream of every cyber-visionary of the early 1990s, finally delivered, a full generation later.

Perhaps the single most dramatic example of this phenomenon of software eating a traditional business is the suicide of Borders and corresponding rise of Amazon. In 2001, Borders agreed to hand over its online business to Amazon under the theory that online book sales were non-strategic and unimportant.

Oops.

Today, the world’s largest bookseller, Amazon, is a software company — its core capability is its amazing software engine for selling virtually everything online, no retail stores necessary. On top of that, while Borders was thrashing in the throes of impending bankruptcy, Amazon rearranged its web site to promote its Kindle digital books over physical books for the first time. Now even the books themselves are software.

Today’s largest video service by number of subscribers is a software company: Netflix. How Netflix eviscerated Blockbuster is an old story, but now other traditional entertainment providers are facing the same threat. Comcast, Time Warner and others are responding by transforming themselves into software companies with efforts such as TV Everywhere, which liberates content from the physical cable and connects it to smartphones and tablets.

Today’s dominant music companies are software companies, too: Apple’s iTunes, Spotify and Pandora. Traditional record labels increasingly exist only to provide those software companies with content. Industry revenue from digital channels totaled $4.6 billion in 2010, growing to 29% of total revenue from 2% in 2004.

Today’s fastest growing entertainment companies are videogame makers — again, software — with the industry growing to $60 billion from $30 billion five years ago. And the fastest growing major videogame company is Zynga (maker of games including FarmVille), which delivers its games entirely online. Zynga’s first-quarter revenues grew to $235 million this year, more than double revenues from a year earlier. Rovio, maker of Angry Birds, is expected to clear $100 million in revenue this year (the company was nearly bankrupt when it debuted the popular game on the iPhone in late 2009). Meanwhile, traditional videogame powerhouses like Electronic Arts and Nintendo have seen revenues stagnate and fall.

The best new movie production company in many decades, Pixar, was a software company. Disney — Disney! — had to buy Pixar, a software company, to remain relevant in animated movies.

Photography, of course, was eaten by software long ago. It’s virtually impossible to buy a mobile phone that doesn’t include a software-powered camera, and photos are uploaded automatically to the Internet for permanent archiving and global sharing. Companies like Shutterfly, Snapfish and Flickr have stepped into Kodak’s place.

Today’s largest direct marketing platform is a software company — Google. Now it’s been joined by Groupon, Living Social, Foursquare and others, which are using software to eat the retail marketing industry. Groupon generated over $700 million in revenue in 2010, after being in business for only two years.

Today’s fastest growing telecom company is Skype, a software company that was just bought by Microsoft for $8.5 billion. CenturyLink, the third largest telecom company in the U.S., with a $20 billion market cap, had 15 million access lines at the end of June 30 –declining at an annual rate of about 7%. Excluding the revenue from its Qwest acquisition, CenturyLink’s revenue from these legacy services declined by more than 11%. Meanwhile, the two biggest telecom companies, AT&T and Verizon, have survived by transforming themselves into software companies, partnering with Apple and other smartphone makers.

LinkedIn is today’s fastest growing recruiting company. For the first time ever, on LinkedIn, employees can maintain their own resumes for recruiters to search in real time — giving LinkedIn the opportunity to eat the lucrative $400 billion recruiting industry.

Software is also eating much of the value chain of industries that are widely viewed as primarily existing in the physical world. In today’s cars, software runs the engines, controls safety features, entertains passengers, guides drivers to destinations and connects each car to mobile, satellite and GPS networks. The days when a car aficionado could repair his or her own car are long past, due primarily to the high software content. The trend toward hybrid and electric vehicles will only accelerate the software shift — electric cars are completely computer controlled. And the creation of software-powered driverless cars is already under way at Google and the major car companies.

Today’s leading real-world retailer, Wal-Mart, uses software to power its logistics and distribution capabilities, which it has used to crush its competition. Likewise for FedEx, which is best thought of as a software network that happens to have trucks, planes and distribution hubs attached. And the success or failure of airlines today and in the future hinges on their ability to price tickets and optimize routes and yields correctly — with software.

Oil and gas companies were early innovators in supercomputing and data visualization and analysis, which are crucial to today’s oil and gas exploration efforts. Agriculture is increasingly powered by software as well, including satellite analysis of soils linked to per-acre seed selection software algorithms.

The financial services industry has been visibly transformed by software over the last 30 years. Practically every financial transaction, from someone buying a cup of coffee to someone trading a trillion dollars of credit default derivatives, is done in software. And many of the leading innovators in financial services are software companies, such as Square, which allows anyone to accept credit card payments with a mobile phone, and PayPal, which generated more than $1 billion in revenue in the second quarter of this year, up 31% over the previous year.

Health care and education, in my view, are next up for fundamental software-based transformation. My venture capital firm is backing aggressive start-ups in both of these gigantic and critical industries. We believe both of these industries, which historically have been highly resistant to entrepreneurial change, are primed for tipping by great new software-centric entrepreneurs.

Even national defense is increasingly software-based. The modern combat soldier is embedded in a web of software that provides intelligence, communications, logistics and weapons guidance. Software-powered drones launch airstrikes without putting human pilots at risk. Intelligence agencies do large-scale data mining with software to uncover and track potential terrorist plots.

Companies in every industry need to assume that a software revolution is coming. This includes even industries that are software-based today. Great incumbent software companies like Oracle and Microsoft are increasingly threatened with irrelevance by new software offerings like Salesforce.com and Android (especially in a world where Google owns a major handset maker).

In some industries, particularly those with a heavy real-world component such as oil and gas, the software revolution is primarily an opportunity for incumbents. But in many industries, new software ideas will result in the rise of new Silicon Valley-style start-ups that invade existing industries with impunity. Over the next 10 years, the battles between incumbents and software-powered insurgents will be epic. Joseph Schumpeter, the economist who coined the term “creative destruction,” would be proud.

And while people watching the values of their 401(k)s bounce up and down the last few weeks might doubt it, this is a profoundly positive story for the American economy, in particular. It’s not an accident that many of the biggest recent technology companies — including Google, Amazon, eBay and more — are American companies. Our combination of great research universities, a pro-risk business culture, deep pools of innovation-seeking equity capital and reliable business and contract law is unprecedented and unparalleled in the world.

Still, we face several challenges.

First of all, every new company today is being built in the face of massive economic headwinds, making the challenge far greater than it was in the relatively benign ’90s. The good news about building a company during times like this is that the companies that do succeed are going to be extremely strong and resilient. And when the economy finally stabilizes, look out — the best of the new companies will grow even faster.

Secondly, many people in the U.S. and around the world lack the education and skills required to participate in the great new companies coming out of the software revolution. This is a tragedy since every company I work with is absolutely starved for talent. Qualified software engineers, managers, marketers and salespeople in Silicon Valley can rack up dozens of high-paying, high-upside job offers any time they want, while national unemployment and underemployment is sky high. This problem is even worse than it looks because many workers in existing industries will be stranded on the wrong side of software-based disruption and may never be able to work in their fields again. There’s no way through this problem other than education, and we have a long way to go.

Finally, the new companies need to prove their worth. They need to build strong cultures, delight their customers, establish their own competitive advantages and, yes, justify their rising valuations. No one should expect building a new high-growth, software-powered company in an established industry to be easy. It’s brutally difficult.

I’m privileged to work with some of the best of the new breed of software companies, and I can tell you they’re really good at what they do. If they perform to my and others’ expectations, they are going to be highly valuable cornerstone companies in the global economy, eating markets far larger than the technology industry has historically been able to pursue.

Instead of constantly questioning their valuations, let’s seek to understand how the new generation of technology companies are doing what they do, what the broader consequences are for businesses and the economy and what we can collectively do to expand the number of innovative new software companies created in the U.S. and around the world.

That’s the big opportunity. I know where I’m putting my money.

Originally published in The Wall Street Journal on August 20, 2011.

ソフトウェアが世界を食っている。

1990年代のドットコムバブルのピークから10年以上が経過し、フェイスブックやツイッターのような10数社の新しいインターネット企業が、プライベート市場での評価額を急速に高め、ときにはIPOに成功したこともあって、シリコンバレーでは賛否両論が巻き起こっています。WebvanやPets.comの全盛期の傷跡がまだ投資家の心に残っているため、人々は「これは危険な新しいバブルに過ぎないのではないか」と問いかけています。

私は、他の人とともに、このケースの反対側を論じてきました。私は、Facebook、Groupon、Skype、Twitter、Zynga、Foursquareなどに投資してきたベンチャーキャピタル会社Andreessen-Horowitzの共同設立者兼ゼネラルパートナーです。また、私は個人的にLinkedInにも投資しています)。私たちは、著名な新しいインターネット企業の多くが、実際に高成長、高利益率、高い防御力を持つビジネスを構築していると考えています。

今日の株式市場はテクノロジーを嫌っており、主要な上場テクノロジー企業のPBR(株価収益率)が過去最低水準であることがそれを物語っています。例えばアップルは、その莫大な収益性と圧倒的な市場占有率にもかかわらず、PERは約15.2であり、株式市場全体とほぼ同じである(アップルはここ数週間で、時価総額で判断した場合、エクソンモービルを抜いてアメリカ最大の企業となった)。そして、おそらく最も重要なことは、人々が常に「バブル!」と叫んでいるときには、バブルは発生しないということです。

しかし、議論の多くは依然として財務的な評価に基づいており、シリコンバレーの優れた新興企業の本質的な価値とは異なっています。私の持論は、今はソフトウェア企業が経済の大部分を占めるような、劇的で広範な技術的・経済的変化の真っ只中にあるというものです。

映画、農業、国防など、ますます多くの主要なビジネスや産業がソフトウェアで運営され、オンラインサービスとして提供されるようになっています。勝利者の多くは、シリコンバレー型の起業家的テクノロジー企業であり、既存の産業構造に侵入し、それを覆しています。今後10年の間に、さらに多くの産業がソフトウェアによって破壊されていくと思いますが、その際には、世界をリードするシリコンバレーの新企業が破壊を行うケースが多いと思われます。

なぜ今、このようなことが起こるのでしょうか。

コンピュータ革命から60年、マイクロプロセッサの発明から40年、そして現代のインターネットの台頭から20年が経過し、ソフトウェアによる産業の変革に必要なすべての技術がようやく機能し、世界規模で広く提供できるようになりました。

私が共同設立したNetscape社にいた10年前には5,000万人程度だったのが、現在では20億人以上の人々がブロードバンドインターネットを利用しています。今後10年で、少なくとも50億人がスマートフォンを所有するようになり、スマートフォンを持つすべての人が、毎日一瞬たりともインターネットにアクセスできるようになると思います。

バックエンドでは、ソフトウェア・プログラミング・ツールやインターネット上のサービスにより、新たなインフラへの投資や新たな従業員の育成を必要とせずに、多くの業界でソフトウェアを活用した新しいグローバルなスタートアップ企業を簡単に立ち上げることができます。私のパートナーであるベン・ホロウィッツが最初のクラウドコンピューティング企業であるLoudcloudのCEOを務めていた2000年当時、基本的なインターネットアプリケーションを実行する顧客のコストは月に約15万円でした。現在、同じアプリケーションをアマゾンのクラウドで実行すると、月に約1,500ドルかかります。

スタートアップのコストが下がり、オンラインサービスの市場が大幅に拡大した結果、世界経済は初めて完全にデジタル化され、1990年代初頭のサイバービジョナリーたちの夢が、一世代後にようやく実現したのです。

ソフトウェアが伝統的なビジネスを食い尽くすという現象の最も劇的な例は、ボーダーズの消滅とそれに対応するアマゾンの台頭でしょう。2001年、ボーダーズは、オンラインでの書籍販売は戦略的に重要ではないという理由で、オンラインビジネスをアマゾンに譲渡することに合意した。

あらら。

現在、世界最大の書店であるアマゾンはソフトウェア企業であり、その中核となる能力は、小売店を必要とせず、ほぼすべてのものをオンラインで販売するための素晴らしいソフトウェア・エンジンである。その上、ボーダーズが倒産の危機に瀕していたとき、アマゾンは自社のウェブサイトを再編成し、初めて物理的な書籍よりもKindleのデジタルブックを宣伝した。今では、本そのものがソフトウェアになっているのだ。

今日、加入者数で最大のビデオサービスは、ソフトウェア企業である。Netflixです。NetflixがBlockbusterを駆逐したのは昔の話ですが、今では他の伝統的なエンターテインメント・プロバイダーも同じ脅威に直面しています。コムキャストやタイムワーナーなどは、コンテンツを物理的なケーブルから解放し、スマートフォンやタブレットに接続する「TV Everywhere」などの取り組みにより、自らをソフトウェア企業に変えて対応しています。

現在、圧倒的なシェアを誇る音楽会社は、ソフトウェア会社でもあります。AppleのiTunes、Spotify、Pandoraなどです。従来のレコード会社は、これらのソフトウェア会社にコンテンツを提供するためだけに存在するようになっています。デジタルチャネルからの収入は、2004年の2%から2010年には46億ドルとなり、総収入の29%を占めるまでに成長しました。

現在、最も急速に成長しているエンタテインメント企業は、やはりソフトウェアメーカーであり、その産業規模は5年前の300億ドルから600億ドルに拡大しています。その中でも最も急成長しているのが、「FarmVille」などのゲームを開発しているZynga社で、同社のゲームはすべてオンラインで提供されています。Zyngaの今年の第1四半期の売上高は2億3,500万ドルに達し、前年同期の2倍以上の売上高となっています。Angry Birds」のメーカーであるRovio社は、今年の売上高が1億ドルをクリアする見込みです(同社は2009年末にiPhoneでこの人気ゲームをデビューさせたときには、ほぼ破産状態でした)。一方、エレクトロニック・アーツや任天堂などの伝統的なビデオゲームの強豪企業は、収益が停滞・低下しています。

何十年にもわたって最高の新作映画制作会社であるピクサーは、ソフトウェア会社でした。ディズニー(Disney! – ディズニーは、アニメーション映画の分野で生き残るために、ソフトウェア会社であるピクサーを買収しなければなりませんでした。

もちろん、写真はずっと前にソフトウェアに食われてしまった。ソフトウェアで動くカメラを搭載していない携帯電話を買うことは事実上不可能ですし、写真は自動的にインターネットにアップロードされ、永久保存され、世界中で共有されます。Shutterfly、Snapfish、Flickrなどの企業がKodakに取って代わりました。

今日、最大のダイレクトマーケティングプラットフォームはソフトウェア企業であるGoogleである。現在、Groupon、Living Social、Foursquareなどの企業がソフトウェアを使って小売マーケティング業界に食い込んできている。グルーポンは、創業からわずか2年で、2010年には7億ドル以上の収益を上げています。

現在、最も急成長している通信会社は、マイクロソフトに85億ドルで買収されたばかりのソフトウェア会社、Skypeです。米国第3位の通信会社であるCenturyLink社(時価総額200億ドル)は、6月末時点のアクセス回線数が1,500万回線で、年率約7%で減少している。Qwest社の買収による収入を除くと、CenturyLink社のこれらのレガシーサービスからの収入は11%以上減少しています。一方、2大通信会社であるAT&Tとベライゾンは、アップルをはじめとするスマートフォンメーカーと提携し、ソフトウェア会社に変身することで生き残っています。

LinkedInは、今日、最も急速に成長している人材紹介会社です。LinkedInでは初めて、従業員が自分の履歴書を管理し、採用担当者がリアルタイムで検索できるようになりました。これによりLinkedInは、4,000億ドル規模の有利な採用業界を食う機会を得ました。

また、主に物理的な世界に存在すると考えられてきた産業のバリューチェーンの多くをソフトウェアが占めています。今日の自動車では、ソフトウェアがエンジンを動かし、安全機能を制御し、乗客を楽しませ、ドライバーを目的地に案内し、各車をモバイル、衛星、GPSネットワークに接続しています。車好きの人が自分で車を修理できた時代ははるか昔のことですが、それは主にソフトウェアの内容が充実しているからです。ハイブリッド車や電気自動車への移行は、ソフトウェアの移行をさらに加速させるでしょう。電気自動車は完全にコンピューターで制御されています。電気自動車は完全にコンピューターで制御されています。また、ソフトウェアで制御されたドライバーレスカーの開発は、Googleや大手自動車会社ですでに進められています。

現在、世界をリードする小売企業であるWal-Martは、ソフトウェアを使って物流・販売機能を強化し、競合他社を圧倒しています。フェデックスも同様に、トラックや飛行機、配送拠点を備えたソフトウェアネットワークと考えてよいでしょう。また、航空会社の成否は、航空券の価格設定、ルートや収率の最適化をソフトウェアで正しく行えるかどうかにかかっています。

石油・ガス会社は、スーパーコンピュータやデータの可視化・分析に早くから取り組んできましたが、これらは今日の石油・ガス探査活動に欠かせないものです。農業分野でも、衛星を使った土壌分析とエーカーごとの種子選択ソフトウェアのアルゴリズムを連動させるなど、ソフトウェアの活用が進んでいます。

金融業界は、過去30年間にソフトウェアによって大きく変化しました。一杯のコーヒーを買う人から、1兆ドル規模のクレジットデフォルトデリバティブを取引する人まで、実質的にすべての金融取引がソフトウェアで行われています。例えば、携帯電話でクレジットカード決済ができる「Square」や、今年の第2四半期に10億ドル以上の収益を上げ、前年比31%増となった「PayPal」などがあり、金融サービスにおける革新的な企業の多くはソフトウェア企業です。

私の考えでは、ソフトウェアをベースにした根本的な変革が必要なのは、医療と教育だと思います。私の所属するベンチャーキャピタルは、この巨大で重要な2つの業界において、積極的なスタートアップ企業を支援しています。この2つの業界は、これまで起業家による変革に大きな抵抗を示してきましたが、ソフトウェアを中心とした優れた起業家の登場により、変化の兆しが見えてきたと考えています。

国防の分野でも、ソフトウェアをベースにしたものが増えています。現代の戦闘兵士は、情報、通信、ロジスティックス、武器のガイダンスを提供するソフトウェアの網に組み込まれています。ソフトウェアを搭載したドローンは、人間のパイロットを危険にさらすことなく空爆を行うことができます。諜報機関では、ソフトウェアを使って大規模なデータマイニングを行い、潜在的なテロリストの計画を発見・追跡しています。

あらゆる業界の企業は、ソフトウェア革命の到来を想定する必要があります。これは、現在、ソフトウェアをベースにしている産業も同様です。OracleやMicrosoftのような既存のソフトウェア企業は、Salesforce.comやAndroidのような新しいソフトウェアにますます脅かされ、無用の長物となっています(特にGoogleが大手携帯電話メーカーを所有している世界では)。

一部の業界、特に石油・ガスのように実社会の要素が強い業界では、ソフトウェア革命は主に既存企業にとってのチャンスとなります。しかし、多くの業界では、新しいソフトウェアのアイデアによって、シリコンバレー型の新しいスタートアップ企業が台頭し、既存の業界を平気で侵食するようになるでしょう。今後10年間で、既存企業とソフトウェアを活用した反乱軍の戦いは壮絶なものになるでしょう。創造的破壊」という言葉を生み出した経済学者、ジョセフ・シュンペーターも誇らしげに語るだろう。

ここ数週間、401(k)の値が上下に変動するのを見ている人は疑うかもしれませんが、これは特にアメリカ経済にとって非常にポジティブな話なのです。Google、Amazon、eBayをはじめとする最近の大手テクノロジー企業の多くが米国企業であることは偶然ではありません。アメリカの優れた研究大学、リスクを許容するビジネス文化、イノベーションを求める株式資本の深いプール、信頼できるビジネス法や契約法の組み合わせは、世界でも前例がなく、比類のないものです。

しかし、私たちはいくつかの課題に直面しています。

まず第一に、今日のすべての新会社は巨大な経済的逆風の中で建設されており、その課題は比較的穏やかだった90年代に比べてはるかに大きいものです。このような時期に会社を設立することの良い点は、成功した会社は非常に強く、回復力があるということです。そして、経済がようやく安定してきたときには、新しい企業の中でも特に優れた企業がさらに急成長するでしょう。

第二に、米国や世界中の多くの人々は、ソフトウェア革命から生まれた偉大な新企業に参加するために必要な教育やスキルを持ち合わせていません。私が関わっている企業はどこも人材に飢えているので、これは悲劇的なことです。シリコンバレーの優秀なソフトウェアエンジニア、マネージャー、マーケッター、セールスマンは、いつでも高収入、高待遇の仕事のオファーを何度も受けることができますが、一方で国民の失業率や不完全雇用は非常に高くなっています。この問題は見た目以上に深刻だ。というのも、既存の産業に従事する多くの労働者が、ソフトウェアをベースとしたディスラプションの波にのまれ、二度とその分野で働くことができなくなるかもしれないからだ。この問題を解決するには、教育以外に方法はありませんが、その道のりは長いと言えます。

最後に、新しい企業は自分たちの価値を証明する必要があります。強力な文化を築き、顧客を喜ばせ、独自の競争力を確立し、そしてもちろん、上昇する評価額を正当化する必要があります。既存の業界で高成長のソフトウェア企業を新たに設立することが簡単だとは誰も思わないでしょう。それは非常に難しいことです。

私は、新種のソフトウェア企業の中でも特に優れた企業と仕事をする機会に恵まれていますが、彼らは本当に優れた企業だと言えます。もし彼らが私や他の人々の期待通りに業績を上げれば、世界経済の礎となる価値の高い企業となり、これまでテクノロジー業界が追求してきたよりもはるかに大きな市場を獲得することができるでしょう。

新世代のテクノロジー企業が何をしているのか、企業や経済にどのような影響を与えているのか、そして米国や世界で革新的なソフトウェア企業を増やすために私たちができることは何か、といったことを考えてみましょう。

これこそが大きなチャンスなのです。私は自分がどこに資金を投じるかを知っています」。

この記事は2011年8月20日付のThe Wall Street Journalに掲載されたものです。

Pocket